Looking out for our neighbours logo

Our Supporters

Looking out for our neighbours is supported by a number of organisations and community groups that are all committed to helping prevent loneliness and social isolation across West Yorkshire and Harrogate.

Door and rose icons
West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership Jo Cox Loneliness Hello my name is... HeartFM
Waving hand icons
The ‘Looking out for our neighbours’ campaign is a wonderful initiative that I am proud to support. Through Leeds Rhinos Foundation we run many projects which aim to bring our communities together and improve people’s health and wellbeing. Rhinos Active Social, which is a free programme for over 55s, was set up to tackle social isolation and encourage people to stay active and has been a huge success. The In Touch Dementia Support group for people living with dementia, has been another valuable resource in our community for people to enjoy afternoons of reliving fond memories of Rugby League at Emerald Headingley Stadium. It is fantastic to see so many organisations across the city coming together to tackle this issue and I think this collaborative work will help make a positive impact.

Gary Hetherington. Chief Executive of Leeds Rhino and Trustee of Leeds Rhinos Foundation

As a social enterprise, and provider of NHS community services, Locala is embedded within our local communities. We therefore didn’t hesitate to support the 'Looking out for our neighbours' campaign. Loneliness is a major issue, but one that can very easily be addressed if we all play our part. We will be encouraging all our colleagues, partners and members to get involved and help us make lives that bit better for those who are isolated and alone.

Karen Jackson. CEO for Locala Community Partnerships (CIC)

Physical activity undoubtedly has a major role to play in supporting the fight against loneliness. Sport and activity brings people together, not just in local teams, but even something as simple as going for a walk with a neighbour. We will continue to work with partners to use physical activity and sport to bring communities together, and are proud to be supporting this campaign.

Nigel Harrison. CEO for Yorkshire Sport Foundation

We work hard to make links and connections with our neighbours at Harrogate Town AFC. This work is extended throughout our community programmes that recognise the importance of reducing loneliness and improving resident’s quality of life. The ‘Looking out for our neighbours’ campaign is hugely important to Harrogate. We all have a duty to work together to create a better life for each other. We hope that by raising awareness we can contribute towards making a positive impact on neighbour’s wellbeing and record a marked increase in partners working together.

Iain Service. Community Development Manager, Harrogate Town AFC Community Foundation

We are delighted to be a part of this great initiative, as a strong family club we feel we are the heart of the Featherstone community and we have a responsibility to support local residents. We are hoping that being involved with the ‘Looking out for our neighbours’ campaign will help us to reignite the community spirit that has always been so passionate in the past.

Amy Hardman. Featherstone Rovers

The Yorkshire Cricket Foundation are delighted to support the 'Looking out for our neighbours' campaign. As a charity working within Yorkshire’s communities, we aim to improve the lives of those living in Yorkshire, with several of our projects tackling loneliness head on. Loneliness can affect anyone, at any time, so it is important that we raise awareness of how small acts of kindness can have a lasting impact on people’s lives. It is important that we use the power of sport, and the affinity with the white rose, to embed this messaging within the communities we engage with.

Beth Cook. Health and Wellbeing Manager, Yorkshire Cricket Foundation

There are over 60,000 elderly residents living in Wakefield who are lonely and feel isolated. We have an opportunity to appeal to the good nature of the people around them and encourage people to look out for their neighbours. This could be in simple ways, like a daily conversation, or even going the extra mile and contributing some time to complete jobs for them. Whatever small amount of time you can provide to your neighbours around you will be appreciated more than you will ever know. Wakefield Trinity Community Trust are delighted to support this project and we will do all we can to raise awareness.

Craig Shepherd. Wakefield Trinity Community Trust’s General Manager

Caring for children with life-shortening and complex health conditions can be a very lonely experience for many families. Parents and carers can become tied to the home, caring for their child 24/7. They can find it almost impossible to take a moment to meet up with friends - and it’s not easy to have people round when your attention is fully taken up with your child. All of which can have a huge impact on their physical and mental wellbeing. That’s why we welcome the ‘Looking after your neighbours’ campaign - just a little bit of friendly contact, an offer of help, a smile and a hello could help reduce that sense of isolation and help make these families’ lives just a little bit easier.

Luen Thompson. CEO at Forget Me Not Children’s Hospice

We know that loneliness and social isolation can affect people of all ages and can have a significant impact on health and wellbeing, and no single sector can tackle these complex issues by working alone. This is why we’re delighted to be supporting the ‘Looking out for your neighbours campaign’, particularly through the Making Every Contact Count (MECC) approach, which aims to support people in making positive changes to their physical - and mental - health and wellbeing, using the millions of interactions that organisations (such as emergency services, health services and voluntary organisations etc) and individuals have each day. It’s also why we advise a range of practical and evidence-based community-centred approaches to improve health and involve those at risk of social exclusion in designing and delivering solutions that address health inequalities. We know that experiencing poor health, including conditions that result in a lack of mobility, or the loss of sight or hearing, can result in social isolation and feelings of loneliness. Therefore, alongside specific interventions for a health issue, it’s important to remember that social activities such as lunch clubs, allotment groups and exercise classes can also make a significant contribution to a patient’s health and wellbeing. We’re encouraging everyone across West Yorkshire and Harrogate to do their bit, by taking the opportunity to reach out to someone who might be feeling lonely in the community, such as an elderly neighbour or someone who lives alone. A small gesture really can make a big difference.

Dr Andrew Furber. Director of Public Health England (PHE) Yorkshire and the Humber

The simple things are often the most powerful and this campaign is a great example of that. Just a “hello” or some help with a simple task can make all the difference to our neighbours and communities.

Matt Graham. Programme Director for West Yorkshire Association of Acute Trusts (hospitals working together)

I am so pleased that we are supporting the ‘Looking out for our neighbours’ campaign. The evidence is really clear about the benefits of reaching out to those who face loneliness and isolation, and also the positive impact on the wellbeing of those who give of their time and through acts of kindness. This is such a great opportunity to help and encourage the communities of Kirklees to look out for one another and stay connected, by just being a little more thoughtful.

Amanda Evans. Service Director for Adult Social Care Operations, Commissioning, Public Health and Adult Social Care, Kirklees Council

‘On behalf of The Cellar Trust and as Chair of the Bradford VCS Assembly, I am really pleased to be supporting this important campaign. People can feel lonely or isolated for so many reasons, and of course, the links between this and our mental and physical health are clear. In the Voluntary and Community Sector (VCS) we work across communities trying to tackle some of these issues – but actually – if we all work together, we can make an even bigger difference. People should never underestimate the fact that small acts of kindness can change lives. In our busy lives, these things can be forgotten but if we all pause and take time for these moments of compassion the world would be a better place.

Kim Shutler-Jones. CEO for The Cellar Trust and Chair of the Bradford Voluntary and Community Sector (VCS) Assembly

Calderdale and Huddersfield hospitals are delighted to support this campaign. It’s amazing what can be achieved from small acts of kindness and it doesn’t have to be the biggest of gestures. We can see the impact of loneliness on so many levels – the list is endless and we can all do our bit to make a positive difference in our neighbourhoods. A smile, a chat in a supermarket, or doing a small chore for our neighbours can go a long way in brightening up a person’s day. I’ve started already – have you?

Helen Barker. Chief Operating Officer, Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust

Andy’s Man Club is open to any man, aged 18 or over, to come and discuss whatever is on their mind. Whether they are having a tough day, week, month or year, dealing with challenges from financial issues, depression, anxiety, loneliness to even suicide, our Club’s doors are open. We are a brotherhood and once you walk into our Club’s door you are part of this brotherhood too. That’s why we understand the importance of having a support network and how even the smallest acts of kindness can make a huge difference. We are therefore proud to support the ‘Looking out for our neighbours’ campaign.

Andy’s Man Club.

Looking out for our neighbours is really important: the small acts of kindness that make a real difference. We can all play our part, as individuals and agencies. As a County Council, we have invested in prevention and in support in towns and villages to keep people well and connected.

Richard Webb. North Yorkshire’s Corporate Director for Health and Adult Services

There are over 60,000 elderly residents living in Wakefield who are lonely and feel isolated. We have an opportunity to appeal to the good nature of the people around them and encourage people to look out for their neighbours. This could be in simple ways, like a daily conversation, or even going the extra mile and contributing some time to complete jobs for them. Whatever small amount of time you can provide to your neighbours around you will be appreciated more than you will ever know. Wakefield Trinity Community Trust are delighted to support this project and we will do all we can to raise awareness.

Wakefield Trinity Rugby Club.

In Bradford District and Craven our vision is for people to be Happy, Healthy, at Home. We believe people are amazing and we value the difference they make for each other through everyday acts of kindness. That’s why we are supporting the ‘Looking out for our neighbours’ campaign.

James Drury. Programme Director, Bradford Integrated Health Board

The devastating impact loneliness can have on our mental and physical health makes it an issue we cannot ignore. Loneliness is a deeply personal experience, unique to every individual; a problem with different causes and different consequences. It’s complicated but we have a huge opportunity to make a difference to the lives of many people who are touched by loneliness across all our communities. Alongside my colleagues in West Yorkshire and Harrogate I am passionate and committed to this campaign, local people and the communities they belong to are our biggest asset and we need to support them in every way we can.

Jo Webster. Chief Officer at NHS Wakefield Clinical Commissioning Group, Strategic Lead of Health and Care Transformation and Integration for Wakefield District

The devastating impact loneliness can have on our mental and physical health makes it an issue we cannot ignore. Loneliness is a deeply personal experience, unique to every individual; a problem with different causes and different consequences. It’s complicated but we have a huge opportunity to make a difference to the lives of many people who are touched by loneliness across all our communities. Alongside my colleagues in West Yorkshire and Harrogate I am passionate and committed to this campaign, local people and the communities they belong to are our biggest asset and we need to support them in every way we can.

Jo Webster. Chief Officer at NHS Wakefield Clinical Commissioning Group, Strategic Lead of Health and Care Transformation and Integration for Wakefield District

Look after your neighbours and they will look after you, they’re a lot closer than a GP and good neighbours can help save lives.

Kursh Siddique. Yorkshire Cancer Patient Forum Chair

I’m really keen we bring back a sense of neighbourliness and community spirit as research shows that loneliness and social isolation has a significant impact on people’s health and wellbeing. By taking time out to look out for people within our communities we can all play a role in keeping people well. I’m throwing my support behind this campaign as it shows how we, as a West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership, are committed to working with our communities across the area we cover.

Philomena Corrigan. Chief Executive for NHS Leeds Clinical Commissioning Group

We see every day the impact of loneliness and isolation on frail and vulnerable people who end up in hospital or another healthcare setting due to declining mental or physical health. It is sadly not uncommon to hear from our patients that they haven’t spoken to another person in a week or perhaps haven’t left their own home for weeks or months. This campaign has our full support: just one small act can go a long way to improving people’s health and wellbeing as well as being a personally rewarding way of contributing to your local community.

Dr Yvette Oade. Acting Chief Executive of Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

Loneliness can affect anyone, anywhere, and we are particularly aware across the breadth and diversity of our geography of the impact of rural isolation and loneliness on people’s health and wellbeing. Our community services can, for some people, often be the only contact they have for a period of days. Equally, we know that our increasingly digital world can also create isolation. Bringing people together not only tackles loneliness but also builds stronger communities which, in turn, have a positive impact on health. This campaign is an important one and I am delighted to support it.

Brendan Brown. Chief Executive, Airedale NHS Foundation Trust, Partnership Lead, Airedale, Wharfedale & Craven Partnership Airedale General Hospital

Although loneliness is by no means an inevitable part of ageing, difficult life events that many experience as people get older, such as bereavement, serious illness or reducing mobility, can all be triggers for becoming more isolated and feeling lonelier. Age UK’s in the West Yorkshire & Harrogate Health and Social Care partnership welcomes this campaign as it reinforces the message of Age UK “that no one should have no one” and as individual charities we reach out to support older people to connect to their communities and to enjoy later life. A simple act of kindness, showing interest in your neighbour or a passer-by or a simple exchange of conversation on a bus can really make all the difference. Anyone and everyone can surely spare the time to smile or wave?

Hilary Thompson. Regional Co-ordinator Age UK Support Services Yorkshire & Humber

The more we learn about the reasons why people use the NHS, the more clearly we understand the role that loneliness and social isolation plays. In order to be well and happy, we need to feel that we are part of things. This campaign is about reminding us that we all have a part to play in that. A smile and a ‘hello’ is sometimes all it takes to help someone through the day.

Dr Matt Walsh. Chief Officer for Calderdale Clinical Commissioning Group

Local voluntary and community organisations are key to helping reduce social isolation and loneliness throughout the UK. This campaign epitomises the ethos of the voluntary and community sector who day in day out work with a range of communities and vulnerable people, offering early help to those in need of some extra support or even just need to see a friendly face. Voluntary Action Calderdale are proud to be part of this initiative to help promote and connect people to local support, reduce the impact of loneliness and isolation through encouraging neighbourliness and community spirit.

Dipika Kaushal. Chief Executive Officer, Voluntary Action Calderdale

Being subjected to domestic violence and abuse destroys self-confidence and leaves victims feeling lonely and isolated and highly likely to suffer from depression or anxiety, self-harm and sleep problems. I’m delighted we’re supporting this campaign because we can all do a little bit more to look out for each other and to show an act of kindness when someone is struggling, feeling alone and needs support.

Rebecca Hirst. Executive Officer, The Pennine Domestic Violence Group

We’re delighted to have the opportunity to support this important campaign which is all about ‘looking out for our neighbours’. We have already signed up for the information packs that we will promote this excellent initiative and distribute through our networks and work groups of disabled people; raising awareness and ensuring the message reaches out into the local communities.

Susan Crowe. Managing Editor for BTM accessible information

We are 100% behind this campaign. We all need to be looking out for those in need in our communities and we’ll be promoting this initiative at our cafes and in our newsletter. [The Memory Lane Café is based Sowerby Bridge, and is a dementia friendly cafe, there to support those living with memory loss as well as their family, friends and carers. The Cafe runs sessions, in an effort to help fight loneliness. They offer the opportunity to meet with other people, socialise and share experiences].

June Harvey. Cafe Co-ordinator, Memory Lane Cafe Calderdale

Harrogate and Rural District Clinical Commissioning Group welcomes the opportunity to be part of this work across the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership. We know that loneliness can have a negative impact on people’s health. Providing tools to help address social isolation within communities could, in some instances, prevent poor health from developing and enable people to live better. We give the campaign our full support and encourage others to do so as well.

Amanda Bloor. Chief Officer for North Yorkshire Clinical Commissioning Groups, NHS Hambleton Richmondshire and Whitby CCG, NHS Harrogate and Rural District CCG, NHS Scarborough Ryedale CCG

Tackling loneliness is something we can all very easily take part in. It doesn’t need to be much - a simple hello, a smile or asking how someone is feeling can make a huge difference to a person’s life. I’m fully supportive of this campaign – it’s a great example of how the smallest of actions when done together can go a long way towards creating a real impact on those around us.

Carol McKenna. Chief Officer for North Kirklees Clinical Commissioning Group and Greater Huddersfield Clinical Commissioning Group

How many of us can honestly say we know who our neighbours are? Knowing and supporting our neighbours is something we’ve forgotten the importance of as a society. We are seeing the knock on effects of this in health and care services, with issues connected to isolation and loneliness escalating into bigger problems which my colleagues in community mental health teams often see. At a time when the NHS is investing in social prescribing on a national level, so we can all invest in it at a very local level by improving our community spirit. So why not take the time to find out more about your neighbours and how you can help each other. I guarantee you’ll both feel the benefits.

Dr Sara Munro. Chief Executive of Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

Loneliness is a big problem that can predispose young children to immediate and long-term negative consequences. There are clear links between loneliness and poor mental and physical health, and between loneliness and lower academic attainment for young people. Loneliness can affect all young people, though some more than others: young carers, young parents, children in poverty, and children in care. In Yorkshire & Humber, 29% of young people feel lonely, the highest figure in England Wales. We need to reduce that figure starting now. That is why I feel that this campaign is so important and why I am supporting it. I wish it every success.

Anne Worrall-Davies. Clinical Lead, West Yorkshire Children Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) New Care Models Pilot

We often think of loneliness as something that affects older people, sadly it can affect anyone at any time in their life. So trying to prevent loneliness and the affect on children and young people’s health is important too. That’s why the Partnership has come together to support this important campaign so we can try and make a bigger difference together. On a personal level, we can all do something to help; the smallest gestures can make a huge difference to someone who is feeling alone, even just saying hello or sending a wave.

Helen Hirst. Chief Officer for Bradford District and Craven; Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven, Bradford City and Bradford District Clinical Commissioning Group

'Looking for our neighbours’ campaign is a great idea that we all need to get behind. It’s not just older people who feel lonely and isolated; we also need to look out for those single parents, young care leavers and other vulnerable adults living alone in our local communities.

Soo Nevison. Chief Executive Officer, Community Action Bradford & District

We’ve already got some great examples of projects around West Yorkshire and Harrogate where the public sector is partnering with voluntary and community organisations to tackle loneliness and bring people together in positive ways. This campaign will allow the good work to continue and spread further, brightening the lives and improving the health of thousands more people in our region. As Chief Executive for Calderdale Council, I’m right behind the campaign. Kindness is at the heart of our vision for place, and we know that acts of kindness, no matter how small, can make a real positive difference in people’s lives.

Robin Tuddenham. CEO for Calderdale Council

I am really pleased that the focus of the campaign is so inclusive. If we can reach some of the isolated families we know would really benefit from this form of “early help” then it would be a job very well done.

Beate Wagner. Director, Children and Young People’s Services Wakefield Council

I wholeheartedly back this campaign. We work with many isolated and lonely carers of all ages and circumstances and see first-hand how a lack of contact can affect their confidence and mental health. This wonderful initiative is a timely reminder to make an effort to better get to know our neighbours. A simple smile, a “hello”, asking how they are, or something as easy as putting someone’s bins away can transform their day.

Chris Whiley. Chief Executive of Charity Carers’ Resource support to unpaid carers across the Bradford district, Harrogate and Skipton

WDH are happy to support the ‘Looking out for our neighbours’ campaign as creating safe and confident communities is a big part of the work we do as a business. We want to encourage our tenants to look out for their older or more vulnerable neighbours especially during the winter. This campaign is a great way to get this message out.

Sarah Roxby. Associate Director – Health, Housing and Transformation for WDH

Research shows that loneliness and vulnerability often go hand in hand. A recent Health Foundation report highlighted how living alone can make people more likely to find themselves in A and E than those living with a family. Pensioners living alone are also 25% more likely to develop a mental health condition. Social isolation can raise the risk of having a stroke by over 30%. These are powerful statistics, and just a few reasons why looking out for our neighbours and others in our community is so important. People affected by cancer tell us that they often feel isolated and alone. We can all play a part in improving the lives of those who don’t have the support networks that are so vital. We can all get involved.

Professor Marina Bloj. Professor of Visual Perception, University of Bradford, Chair, West Yorkshire and Harrogate Cancer Alliance, Patient Experience Group

We wholeheartedly support the ‘Looking out for our neighbours campaign.’ Preventing social isolation is also a focus for the Fire Service and a key element of our home visit programme, called Safe and Well, which aims to safeguard some of the most vulnerable people in our communities. We have noticed that people who live alone are at increased risk if a fire does break out so it is important that smoke alarms are fitted and tested regularly to give an early warning of fire in the home of someone who lives alone. Fitting or testing a smoke alarm is something that you could do for an elderly relative or neighbour to make them safer. If you’re not sure how then make the Fire and Rescue Service aware and we will visit someone in their home and offer simple fire safety advice and fit smoke alarms for free. Our website has details on how to book a home visit at www.westyorksfire.gov.uk As Good Samaritans we have the power to make a difference to the people living around us and prevent them from coming to any harm. Often it’s just a kind gesture or a helping hand that can have a hugely positive impact.

Area Manager for Service Delivery. West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Services

I often say that teams, such as our community nurses, physiotherapists and occupational therapists are the ‘glue’ that hold our communities together. They are because they see people in their own homes or close to where they live. Our teams understand both person and place and this understanding is important because it helps people to stay well and out of a hospital setting. But, alongside this, in every community, is a wealth of untapped resource. People who bring their own unique understanding of their community, its strengths and its challenges to a situation. This knowledge is powerful. If we can build a network of likeminded people across all our communities I believe we will be in a better position to support the most vulnerable in society – even if we need to start one cup of tea at a time.

Thea Stein. CEO Leeds Community Healthcare NHS Trust

So many people affected by cancer tell us that they feel lonely and isolated, after their diagnosis, during treatment, after their treatment ends. The support of family, friends and others around them plays such a vital role in their recovery and wellbeing. Imagine how much worse those feelings can be without that support network. Just a friendly face, a chat, an offer to help, just making time to care, can make all the difference to someone who is alone, who is lonely, who is vulnerable, living with or beyond their cancer diagnosis. That’s why the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Cancer Alliance is backing this important campaign.

Professor Sean Duffy. Programme Clinical Director and Alliance Lead, West Yorkshire & Harrogate Cancer Alliance and Strategic Clinical Lead / Programme Director, Leeds Cancer Programme

It’s important to consider all aspects of life that influence people’s health. Research shows us loneliness and social isolation can be as harmful to our health as smoking. “Simple acts of kindness, such as checking our neighbours are safe and well, or paying them a visit so they don’t feel lonely, are hugely important and something most of us can do. This campaign is a great way to remind us all to do this.”

Jo-Anne Wass. Chief Operating Officer, Leeds Academic Health Partnership

We’re delighted to be supporting and backing this important campaign which I hope will help tackle the enormous impact loneliness brings to people’s lives - at every level - regardless of age. Social relationships are key to good health and saying hello or having a chat doesn’t take a lot but can mean so much to people who are living alone without the support of family and friends around them.

Merran McRae. CEO for Wakefield Council

An important part of the work of Kirklees Neighbourhood Housing is good housing and health. We know that not only health care services keep people well; where you live, your neighbours and good community spirit where people look out for one another is very important. I’m pleased that KNH is supporting this important campaign to tackle loneliness – the positives of having good neighbours is 'peace of mind' and knowing someone is there when you may need them – something we all need no matter where we live.

Joanne Bartholomew. Chief Executive Officer for Kirklees’ Neighbourhood Housing

Loneliness can have a big effect on someone’s mental health and general wellbeing. It can affect people of any age and from all walks of life. The healthcare providers in West Yorkshire and Harrogate are working together to reduce suicide and self-harm, and recognise that when people feel lonely and disengaged with life they are at a higher risk. This campaign will have a huge impact on our local communities by helping to reduce isolation and improve neighbourhood relationships. Through simple acts of kindness and listening we can help to reduce isolation and feelings of hopelessness. This will make our local places safer and friendlier for everyone.”

Michael Doyle, RMN, PhD. Lead for West Yorkshire & Harrogate Integrated Care System Suicide Prevention Strategy Deputy Director of Nursing and Quality, South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

As Chief Executive of Craven District Council I fully support this initiative. District Councils play a vital role in enhancing the health and wellbeing of our residents, and at a time when we are very aware of the impact of loneliness and isolation on physical and mental health it is important to raise awareness of the simple things we can all do to help people feel connected within their community.

Paul Shevlin. Chief Executive of Craven District Council

Looking out for our neighbours is an important message for us all – and it’s often the simplest of things that can make a big difference to people living alone, single parents or older people. This campaign is a reminder for us all – should we ever need one - to say hello, ask if someone wants anything from the shops or if you can move their wheelie bins. Acts of kindness are endless and it doesn’t take much to make someone feel they aren’t alone.

Dr Ros Tolcher. CEO for Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust

Medical advances mean people are living longer, but sadly too many are lonely. Transforming healthcare isn’t just about hospitals, new treatments and technologies; it is crucially about living and ageing well. Keeping people active and engaged in their communities is a key part of this work and we all have a role to play – and looking out for our neighbour is a good place to start and something we can all do to be of support.

Martin Barkley. Chief Executive, The Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust

Carers play a vital role in our communities but often end up feeling isolated and lonely due to being housebound and their responsibilities for looking after a relative. This campaign is great news for carers who will hopefully have people living near them looking out for them so they can stay happy and healthy.

Fatima Khan-Shah. West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership, Programme Lead for Carers

We know that older people living alone are more likely to develop a mental health condition. Social isolation can also raise the risk of having a stroke by a third. It’s not just older people; we know the children and young people often feel lonely too. If we can work with our communities to look out for their neighbours then we have the potential to positively impact on the high and increasing demand on health and care services. To do this successfully we need to change the conversation with people – working across the area in partnership gives us a real opportunity to do this.

Dr Adam Sheppard. Chair of West Yorkshire and Harrogate Urgent and Emergency Care Programme Board

As the region’s ambulance service we’re in the privileged position of being invited into people’s homes at times of need. Sadly, we frequently come into contact with individuals whose isolation has reduced their resilience and impacted detrimentally on their physical and mental health. For many reasons these people are unable to seek the appropriate help and support they need at an early enough stage. Neighbours can and often do make a real difference to people’s lives by identifying and assisting the vulnerable within their communities. The ‘Looking out for our neighbours’ campaign is a great way to make a real difference to people’s lives and help to make our communities stronger.

Rod Barnes. Chief Executive of Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust

People of all ages can feel alone for a variety of reasons, especially in winter. This important campaign is a helpful reminder that it’s often the smallest acts of kindness that makes the biggest difference to a person’s life. As neighbours we could all look out for each other a bit more. And local organisations can also help bring people together in shared endeavours. That’s why our Partnership has allocated £1m to support voluntary and community organisations in our local areas - Bradford District and Craven, Calderdale, Harrogate, Kirklees, Leeds and Wakefield – bringing greater connection and happiness to our communities.

Rob Webster. CEO Lead for West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership and CEO for South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

All too often families living with dementia shut themselves off from social gatherings and activities, thus becoming increasingly isolated which can have a very negative impact on their health and wellbeing. We are supporting this campaign because it is so important to look out for each other, to offer a helping hand, especially to the most vulnerable people in our communities.

Dr Hilda Hayo. CEO and Chief Admiral Nurse at Dementia UK

A simple introduction can go a long way in starting a human connection and striking a conversation. We live in a very diverse society and it is everyone's responsibility to look out for other people and be kind and considerate. This campaign is a gentle reminder for us all to look out for others - a simple 'hello, my name is...' or 'can I help you in any way' goes a long way to making someone feel included and cared for. I am more than happy for both myself and the #hellomynameis campaign (that my late wife and I started) to support the 'looking out for your neighbours' campaign.

Chris Pointon. Co-founder and global campaign ambassador - #hellomynameis

I feel passionately about creating well-connected communities where everyone is happy and healthy and has a sense of identity and belonging, and it is heart-warming to see the work that Jo started on this important issue being continued in such a positive way in the county where we grew up. Much of my focus since Jo was killed has been on how we can build compassionate communities and bring people together. The national Great Get Together campaign which we run across the weekend of Jo's birthday in June is the centre piece of this, and it would be wonderful to think that some of the connections which will be made through the 'Looking out for your Neighbours' initiative can be continued and we see lots of Great Get Togethers happening in June as a result! I believe if we all work together to prevent loneliness and its associated health risks, we can reduce the demand on health and care services and have a positive impact on the wellbeing of everyone, which is why I am delighted to support this campaign.

Kim Leadbeater. Ambassador for The Jo Cox Foundation and Jo's Sister

Speech bubble icons
  • 20:20 Foundation Trust
  • 2buwakefield
  • 5 Lane Community Partnership
  • Age UK Calderdale and Kirklees
  • Age UK Leeds
  • Age UK North Craven
  •  
  • Aireborough Voluntary Services to the Elderly
  • Airedale Academy
  • Airedale Neighbourhood Management Board
  • Airedale NHS Foundation Trust
  • AIWA
  • Andy's Man Club
  •  
  • Armley Helping Hands
  • Belle Isle Winter Aid
  • Bradford Council
  • Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust
  • Bradford Holycroft Surgery
  • Bradford Talking Media
  •  
  • Bradford Trident
  • Brig Royd Surgery
  • Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust
  • Calderdale Lighthouse
  • Canal Connections CIC
  • Capsticks Solicitors LLP
  • Carers Count
  • Carers Leeds
  • Carers Wakefield and District
  • Caring Together in Woodhouse and Little London
  • Chain Lane Community Hub Knaresborough
  • Chapel FM
  • City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council - People Can / Women's Health Network
  • Clem’s Garden CIC
  • Cnet
  • Community Action Bradford & District
  • Community Connections, Yorkshire Children's Centre
  • Community Links
  • Community Pharmacy West Yorkshire
  • Community Plus
  • Community Voices
  • Conexus Healthcare
  • Connecting Care Hubs
  • Contact the Elderly
  • Creative Minds
  • CREW
  • Crossley Heath School
  • Dancing for Wellbeing CIC
  • Dementia UK
  • Dr Chandra and Partners
  • Dyneley House Surgery
  • Elmwood Family Doctors PPG
  • Engaging Communities CIC
  • Fairfax Community Centre
  • Featherstone Rovers Foundation
  • Forget Me Not Children's Hospice
  • Formations Care Services
  • Foundation Leeds
  • Foundation UK
  • GIPSIL Ltd
  • Halifax Opportunities Trust
  • Hamara Healthy Living Centre
  • Harrogate & Ripon Centres for Voluntary Service
  • Harrogate & Rural District Clinical Commissioning Group
  • Harrogate Borough Council
  • Harrogate Easier Living Project
  • Healthwatch Bradford and District
  • Healthwatch Kirklees
  • Healthwatch North Yorkshire
  • Healthwatch Wakefield
  • Heart FM
  • Hebden Bridge Arts Festival
  • Hebden Bridge Community Association
  • Holme Valley Parish Council
  • Holmfirth Camera Club
  • Holmfirth Events
  • Home Group
  • Incommunities
  • Inspire North
  • Jo Cox Foundation
  • Keighley Big Local
  • Kirkburton Health Centre
  • Kirklees Council
  • Kirklees Library Service
  • Kirklees Metropolitan Council
  • Kirklees Neighbourhood housing
  • Kirklees Visual Impairment Network
  • Kissing It Better
  • Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  •  
  • Leeds and Yorkshire Partnership Trust
  • Leeds Cares
  • Leeds Christian Community Trust
  • Leeds City College
  • Leeds City Council
  • Leeds Community Foundation
  • Leeds Community Healthcare NHS Trust
  • Leeds Community Spaces
  • Leeds Irish Health and Homes
  • Leeds Older People's Forum
  • Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust
  • Life Destiny Church
  • Linda Sage Mentoring
  • Live Well Wakefield
  • Local Care Direct
  • Local Services 2 You
  • Locala Community Partnerships
  • LS14 Trust
  • Macmillan Cancer Support
  • Making Space Wellbeing Service
  • Memory Lane Café
  • Mencap in Kirklees
  • MHA
  • Middleton Elderly Aid Social Centre
  • Modality
  • Mummy Social
  • My Homecare Yorkshire
  • Natures Coaching
  • New College Pontefract
  • NHS Airedale Wharfedale and Craven Clinical Commissioning Group
  • NHS Bradford Districts Clinical Commissioning Group
  • NHS England
  • NHS Greater Huddersfield Clinical Commissioning Group
  • NHS Leeds Clinical Commissioning Group
  • NHS North Kirklees Clinical Commissioning Group
  • NHS Patient Transport VCS
  • NHS Wakefield Clinical Commissioning Group
  • North Yorkshire County Council
  • North Yorkshire Police
  • North Yorkshire Sport
  • North-East Windhill Community Association
  • Northern Powergrid
  • Nova
  • Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner for West Yorkshire
  • Older People's Action in the Locality
  • Overgate Hospice
  • Pennine Domestic Violence Group
  • Pennine Magpie
  • Positive Minds
  • Public Health England Yorkshire and Harrogate
  • Raabani Matriarch Support
  • Recovery College Kirklees
  • Richmond Hill Elderly Action
  • Royal College of General Practitioners
  • Royal College of Nursing
  • Royds Community Association
  • Sakura Community Music Therapy
  • Senior Staying Well Worker
  • Shepley Health Centre
  • Skelmanthorpe Family Doctors
  • South West Yorkshire Mental Health Foundation Trust
  • South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Space2
  • Spirit in Mind
  • St. George's Community Centre
  • Stagg Injury Rehabilitation
  • Stonewater
  • Successful Mindset Ltd
  • Sunnybank PHC
  • The Cellar Trust
  • The Conservation Volunteers
  • The Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust
  • The Piece Hall Trust
  • The Unmumsy Mum
  • Together Housing
  • True Colours Community CIC
  • Turning Point
  • VAC - Improving Local Lives
  • Virtual Socket Interface Alliance
  • Voluntary Action Calderdale
  • Voluntary Action Leeds
  • Volunteering Bradford
  • Wakefield Council
  • Wakefield District Frailty Prevention Partnership
  • Wakefield Trinity Rugby Club (Community Trust)
  • Wakefield West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue
  • Warwick Ahead
  • Waypoint Training
  • West Yorkshire and Harrogate Cancer Alliance
  • West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership
  • West Yorkshire and Harrogate Partnership
  • West Yorkshire Association of Acute Trusts
  • West Yorkshire Police
  • Womens Counselling and Therapy Service in Leeds
  • Woodhouse Medical Practice
  • Yorkshire Ambulance Service
  • Yorkshire Cancer Patient Forum
  • Yorkshire Cricket Club
  • Yorkshire Cricket Foundation
  • Yorkshire Sport Foundation
  • Your Consortium Ltd
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •